Engwe M20 review: A full-suspension 1,000W electric moped for a budget price

The Engwe M20 electric bike looks like another SUPER73 knockoff. And it is. But the bike also has two things going for it: It has an option for a second battery pack to double its range, and it also offers full suspension for less than the price of a non-suspension SUPER73.

So what’s the trade-off? Well, nothing here is amazing quality. It’s all fairly basic, decent-level stuff. But nothing is going to knock your socks off when it comes to the build quality.

Even so, there are plenty of redeeming qualities. From the long range to the high power and even the dual headlights, Engwe has made up for quality with sheer quantity. And it actually works pretty well.

Check out what I mean in my video review below. Then keep reading for all of the details on the Engwe M20 e-bike.

Engwe M20 Video Review

Engwe M20 tech specs

  • Motor: 750W rear geared hub motor (1,000W peak power)
  • Top speed: 28 mph (45 km/h)
  • Range: Up to 94 miles (151 km) on pedal assist with two batteries
  • Battery: 2x 48V 13Ah 624 Wh
  • Weight: 89 lb (40.5 kg) with 2x batteries
  • Max capacity: 265 lb (120 kg)
  • Wheels: Mag wheels with 20-inch x 4.0-inch tires
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes with 160mm rotors
  • Extras: Dual headlight, taillight, fenders, 7-speed gearing, front & rear suspension, kickstand
  • Price: $1,299 (single battery) or $1,599 (dual battery)
engwe m20 electric bike

What do we have here?

The Engwe M20 is a prototypical moped-style e-bike.

Instead of a step-through moped frame, it opts for a common box-style minibike frame.

There’s no adjustable seat, making this more of a motorcycle-style ride. Sure, there are functional pedals, but pedaling is not comfortable due to the seating position. It’s possible, but you probably wouldn’t want to do it for 10 miles straight. I’m only 5’7″ (170 cm), and even I have that knees-in-your-chest feeling while pedaling it.

But while the Engwe M20 has half the pedaling comfort of most e-bikes, it doubles up elsewhere. Not only do you have the option for dual batteries (though you can save $300 by choosing the single battery option), but you’ve also got dual suspension and even dual headlights.

Why do you need two headlights on a bicycle? I have absolutely no idea. My only guess is that if one dies, at least you’ve got some redundancy built into the system.

But the dual suspension is actually a bit more useful. The front suspension is better than the rear, which I found to be a little stiff for my lightweight self. Since the rear isn’t adjustable, there was no way for me to dial in the suspension to my weight. Even so, it still made a difference when hopping off curbs or hitting potholes.

The front suspension isn’t top-notch stuff either, but it arguably makes an even bigger impact by taking the shock out of your wrists. Even without rear suspension, most e-bike riders are used to raising out of the saddle and letting their legs do the suspension work when necessary. But with both front and rear suspension, that’s less of a requirement on the Engwe M20.

The dual batteries are a great option for anyone that finds themselves on longer rides. The company claims a max range of 47 miles (75 km) with a single battery, but that’s on pedal assist at lower speeds.

You’ve got a 1,000W peak-rated motor at your disposal and Class 3 top-speed capability with a claimed max speed of 28 mph (45 km/h). So you’re probably not going to be sticking to low power very often. And when you consider that the pedal assist lag from the cadence sensor is considerable, to the tune of a couple of seconds, you’ll be even more likely to grab some throttle.

Throttle-centric riders will probably get somewhere between 20-25 miles (32-40 km) per battery in real-life riding. So with the dual battery setup, a solid 40-50 miles (64-80 km) is a reality.

Speaking of reality, that 28 mph (45 km/h) top speed didn’t quite make it into existence in my testing. I rarely saw 27 mph and usually topped out closer to 26 mph. Perhaps with a tailwind, you’d get 28 mph, but I won’t ding the Engwe M20 too hard there. Plenty of Class 3 e-bikes don’t make it all the way to 28, and falling 3-5% short of the limit might even be a buffer to ensure compliance with e-bike regulations.

One note on the 1,000W peak-rated motor: That peak power doesn’t seem to come on immediately. In fact, I was surprised that the bike felt a bit sluggish off the line. After several seconds I could get moving at a good clip, but there’s no chance you’re going to be slinging dirt or laying down rubber when you twist that throttle.

engwe m20 electric bike

With performance out of the way, the rest of the bike is equally decent. Again, nothing here is top-notch, but it all seems to work well.

The mechanical disc brakes work fine, though I was surprised to see rather small 160mm rotors.

The throttle is a full-twist throttle, which is common on motorcycles and seated scooters but is nearly nonexistent on e-bikes. The main reason half-twist throttles are more common is because less experienced riders aren’t as likely to accidentally twist the handlebar and gun it while walking the bike around. I guess the motorcycle industry assumes riders have a bit more experience. There’s nothing wrong with a full-twist throttle on an e-bike, but I’m just a fan of half twists for safety. Wrist strain can be a consideration, though if you can’t apply a couple of ounces of pressure with your hand for extended periods, you probably aren’t in the group looking for a powerful e-bike.

The Engwe M20 comes with off-road tires that feature aggressively knobby tread, which is surprising considering this seems to be better outfitted as a street moped. Even so, the bike is still fun to lean hard into turns on the street. And if you really want to get your dual sport riding on, those knobby tires will let you do trails on the weekend and commuter rides during the week.

Engwe M20: What’s the verdict?

I’ve done a lot of nitpicking about the M20, but it’s actually a really fun e-bike to ride. And at either $1,299 or $1,599, depending on the number of batteries you choose, it’s a pretty darn affordable option in the e-moped space.

There are better deals out there, but few have this much battery at their disposal.

So for a thrilling type of ride that can handle various terrain all in one bike, the Engwe M20 scores points. It doesn’t have the quality of name-brand e-bikes like those from SUPER73, but it delivers a good time for a great price. And for a select group of riders trying to shop on a budget, that’s just as important.

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